Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
EHD has returned?
#1
https://wset.com/news/local/outbreak-of-...QOMoeSwD2M
Reply
Thanks given by:
#2
definitely been hot enough to mess with an infected deer's ability to regulate body temperature
[Image: gallardo.jpg]
You went full diabetes... Never go full diabetes.
Reply
Thanks given by:
#3
(10-03-2019, 01:17 PM)Carcass Wrote: https://wset.com/news/local/outbreak-of-...QOMoeSwD2M

Got this from DGIF first part of September. Plus I added a report and a deer for Chesterfield late september

To DMAP Cooperators,
 
I hope this email finds you well.  In the past week or so we have received many reliable reports of HD.  Most of these reports are from NOVA or the Southwest Piedmont (centered around Franklin County).  See the current 2019 HD report table below.  We had been lucky the past two summers (2017 and 2018) and had experienced very quiet HD years.  It looks like our luck may have run out for 2019.
 
Simply put, an HD deer is best described as an otherwise healthy looking deer found dead or dying near (or floating in) water in late summer or early fall.  The reason they go to these areas is because they are running a very high fever during the onset of the disease.  Lying on cool moist and wet soil is obviously Mother Nature’s way of treating a fever in sick deer.   They are literally “out of it” during this initial high fever stage of the disease.  One of the best indicators of an HD deer is a dead deer found floating in a pond or lake.  Normally a deer can swim like a fish.  A HD deer swims like a rock (watch  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=34Af42yubfI ).  For more information on HD see the attached HD brochure or go to https://www.dgif.virginia.gov/wildlife/diseases/hd/
 
HD is common east of the Blue Ridge, and we documented two big HD years in 2012 and especially 2014 in eastern Virginia.  In 2014 the deer kill in HD-affected counties was down significantly, and these deer herds are just now recovering (see the attached 2014 HD article).  HD is not common west of the Blue Ridge, but we have seen it in this region before during 2007 and 2012, both of which were bad drought years.  The best predictor of HD is drought, and our current HD reports match the current as of today Virginia drought map (also attached below).  This drought map can be found at https://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/ .
 
What Should You Do If You Find What You Think Is A Dead Or Dying HD Deer?
Do not attempt to contact, disturb, kill, or remove the animal. Please report the approximate location of the animal to the Wildlife Helpline at (855) 571-9003 or to the Department office below that is nearest to you.  Offices are located at Blacksburg (540) 961-8304, Farmville (434) 392-9645, Fredericksburg (540) 899-4169, Lynchburg (434) 525-7522, Marion (276) 783-4860, Verona (540) 248-9360, and Charles City (804) 829-6580.  You can also call or email your DMAP biologist (see attached DMAP contact map). 
 
The Department annually maintains records of HD mortality reports documenting the location and approximate number of animals involved.  Please be advised that, unless there are extenuating circumstances, the HD report will not result in an on-site visit by Department staff.
 
What Can Be Done To Prevent HD?
At present there is little that can be done to prevent or control HD. Although die-offs of deer due to HD often cause alarm, past experiences have shown that mortality will not totally decimate local deer populations and the outbreak will be curtailed by the onset of cold weather.
 
If you have any questions, please call your DMAP biologist (see attached DMAP contact map).
 
Sincerely, 
 

Matt Knox
Deer Project Coordinator
P 434.525.7522 / M 434.546-1727
Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries
CONSERVE. CONNECT. PROTECT.
A 1132 Thomas Jefferson Road, Forest VA 24551-9223
www.dgif.virginia.gov
 
 
This electronic communication may contain confidential or privileged information for an intended recipient.  If you are not the intended recipient or received this email in error, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this email without disclosing, duplicating or otherwise transmitting the contents, including all attachments.
 County    County                Reports    Number of Deer

019    Bedford County           6                 6

021    Bland County               1                 1

031    Campbell County         1                 1

059    Fairfax County             3                 11

061    Fauquier County          1                 1

063    Floyd County               1                 1

065    Fluvanna County         1                 1

067    Franklin County           8                 29

081    Greensville County       1                  1

085    Hanover County          3                  5

089    Henry County              1                 1

107    Loudoun County         1                  5

109    Louisa County             1                    1

145    Powhatan County        1                 1

153    Prince William County    2               2

163    Rockbridge County       1               1

165    Rockingham County     1                   1

173    Smyth County             1                 1

187    Warren County            1                  1

191    Washington County     1                 1

195    Wise County                1                 1
                                            38                  73


 

Reply
Thanks given by:
#4
Add two from southern Albemarle Co. into that count.
Nice buck and a doe. Initially thought they had been bow shot (out of season) and left/not recovered.

Further investigation, no wounds on either and found almost exactly as the article states, near stream/cool/wet area.

Buck was young-ish (3-4 yr maybe) with a nice wide 9-pt rack.
Reply
Thanks given by:
#5
Interesting where it seems to show up, considering central VA has been hit with a drought as well.

As far as I know it, once infected these are dead deer. Anyone know if they can survive it?



Reply
Thanks given by:
#6
(10-09-2019, 12:52 PM)Bucksnort32 Wrote: Interesting where it seems to show up, considering central VA has been hit with a drought as well.

As far as I know it, once infected these are dead deer.  Anyone know if they can survive it?

yes, some survive HD (EHD or blue tongue) but none survive CWD.
the HD survivors often will have splitting hooves when later harvested.
Reply
Thanks given by:
#7
(10-09-2019, 03:07 PM)Carcass Wrote:
(10-09-2019, 12:52 PM)Bucksnort32 Wrote: Interesting where it seems to show up, considering central VA has been hit with a drought as well.

As far as I know it, once infected these are dead deer.  Anyone know if they can survive it?

yes, some survive HD (EHD or blue tongue) but none survive CWD.
the HD survivors often will have splitting hooves when later harvested.

Good to know, thanks!



Reply
Thanks given by:
#8
(10-09-2019, 03:33 PM)Bucksnort32 Wrote:
(10-09-2019, 03:07 PM)Carcass Wrote:
(10-09-2019, 12:52 PM)Bucksnort32 Wrote: Interesting where it seems to show up, considering central VA has been hit with a drought as well.

As far as I know it, once infected these are dead deer.  Anyone know if they can survive it?

yes, some survive HD (EHD or blue tongue) but none survive CWD.
the HD survivors often will have splitting hooves when later harvested.

Good to know, thanks!

Brad,

Yes they survive it, actually most do. It is why when we are checking deer in the club that we are supposed to check the hooves to see if they are split or sloughing. The damage to the hoof is a clear sign that they suffered and survived the fight with EHD. The High fever damages/weakens the hooves.

Joe
Reply
Thanks given by:


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)