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Food plot in the works
#1
I finally got some time to start roughing out a 50'x150' food plot and my goal is to have it ready for planting by early spring. I'm just starting to research my options but I'd like to go with a perennial mix of some sort and I'd also like something to establish some cover around the border. Pretty thick cover on 3 sides with a power line just to the north. Any suggestions on plants or mixes to consider or avoid will be greatly appreciated. Soil looks very good and I'm planning to do a soil test soon. Here are a couple of pictures after a full day of work last weekend.

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#2
What ever you don’t buy mixes. There are plenty of seeds you can mix yourself cheaper on Amazon.

I want to plant some hastas around my spot. Deer love them things and they keep coming back and getting bigger.


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#3
Definitely looking to come up with my own mix, just so many choices. I hope you’re doing well man!
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#4
Working your own plot will definitely be worth the time invested when the deer start earning their rewards points for the visits.
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#5
to me looks like might need to consider opening it up more, sun and water are the two most important things. If possible cut some trees and use as a brush pile to also help direct the deer to come into it the way you want.
Apply the lime as required soon so has chance to work.
There are a ton of options, will need something that will stand up to their browsing. Alpha's and clovers are good choices in my options. When planted put a couple caes around a section or tow to see the difference and how hard they are browsing. I planted Whitetail Institute Tall tubers and came up great and they were as high as my knees and then the deer destroyed it before it had a chance to developed the tubers for late season.
It is very rewarding, good luck!! Keep us posted
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#6
Thanks guys. I'm planning to take out everything under 6" diameter or so and soil testing is on my short list of things to get knocked out. I'll be sure to post updates as I go and if I can make it work at this spot I plan to put an IP camera or two on the plot. Gonna take some time to make that happen though, since plot is over 300 yards from my closest access point at the moment.
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#7
What is going on with the open ground ( field), to the right of you picture)?

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#8
(01-30-2020, 07:39 PM)BAY BEAGLE Wrote: What is going on with the open ground ( field), to the right of you picture)?

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That is a power line that runs through the woods at the back of the property. My property bumps up to it, otherwise that would be my food plot. I just bought the place in October, so once I get a chance to meet the landowner I might see if he's cool with me planting that with more of a summer plot and then I'll keep mine more geared towards fall. 
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#9
Here is a quick shot of what I currently have to work with. The yellow blob is where I'm roughing out the food plot now.


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#10
I always thought a power line was a deeded easement, that lays between property lines. I could be wrong in regards to your situation.
In regards to your original question; it is going to be tuff to compete with those trees, regarding sucking the moisture out of the ground. Also competing with the canopy above, they will have a tuff time receiving needed sunlight, come summer. The roots of a tree are as broad as its canopy. Your first move is to have a soil test. Have somone knowledgeable to direct you on to what fertilizer to apply. (I just put mine down, so my soul will be at its peak come mid march). PH is equal important as fertilizer, so that should be in place yesterday. There is a fast acting lime called Sal-a-lime (or something to that effect), that can be used to speed the process up. To figure how much land your working, there is a site called "IN FOREST" that has tools to help measure land. So you know how much of product to put per acre. What to plant???? Something shade tolerant. Other negative scenarios, regarding planting in the forest. Without discing, your roots will not be able to get below compacted soil, or hard pan. Soil erosion on the slopes, without controlling run off into the stream bed. Top soil is gold, so you need to treat it as such. These are just some of the things to consider. I wish you the best.

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